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Industry Headlines

Industry Headlines

Cameron Signs Two Long-Term Transocean Service Agreements

-1 DAYS AGO

Cameron, a Schlumberger company, has signed two 10-year pressure control equipment management service contracts on behalf of Transocean valued at greater than $350 million.

The first contract calls for Schlumberger to manage Transocean’s Cameron risers in the Gulf of Mexico. This comprehensive ag...

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Total Valve Systems, Continental Disc/Groth Sign Distributorship Deal

37 MINS AGO

Total Valve Systems (TVS) announces a new distributorship with Continental Disc (CDC) and Groth Corporation. The two companies will provide customer service and relief & vacuum products to customers worldwide. Total Valve Systems will be responsible for sale and distribution to Oklahoma, Kansas, T...

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Plains All American Expanding Cactus Pipeline Capacity

-1 DAYS AGO

Plains All American (PAA) Pipeline, L.P. is expanding the capacity on its Cactus pipeline from McCamey to Gardendale, TX to approximately 390,000 barrels per day. The expansion will allow PAA to move increasing production volumes from the Permian Basin to Corpus Christi and other delivery points along...

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New Investments Spur Permian Oil Production Increase

1 DAY AGO

The Department of Energy (DOE) said on Tuesday that oil production in the Permian Basin could increase by 53,000 bpd by next month. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), that is the largest monthly increase in the region in a year.

“The EIA’s first shale oil forecast o...

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Industrial Production Sees Largest Rise in More Than Two Years

1 DAY AGO

Industrial production rose 0.8% in December, the largest increase since November 2014, after falling 0.7% the previous month. For the fourth quarter as a whole, the index slipped 0.6% at an annual rate.

Manufacturing output moved up 0.2% in December, as an increase in durable manufacturing outweighed d...

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IMF Raises U.S. Economic Growth Forecast

2 DAYS AGO

After a lackluster outturn in 2016, economic activity is projected to pick up pace in 2017 and 2018, especially in emerging market and developing economies. However, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) noted in its new World Economic Outlook, there is a wide dispersion of possible outcomes around ...

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Three Golden Rules for Severe Service Valves

If you’d just bought a new high-performance sports car, you’d likely protect your investment by following the manufacturer’s instructions for breaking in the engine. You’d also probably leave the spare tire in the trunk so that a flat wouldn’t leave you stranded on the side of the road.

The same logic applies to severe service valves. These valves protect and control some of a plant’s most essential and costly equipment, such as turbines, compressors and pumps. They handle high-pressure fluids and are integral parts of a plant’s most critical processes. They’re usually costly, custom-designed and highly engineered, making them significant financial investments. It only makes sense, therefore, to take the proper steps when bringing a new plant online and to be prepared to make repairs when the unexpected happens.

By following three simple guidelines, plant operators can keep their plants running efficiently and safely, minimize downtime and maintenance costs, and prevent catastrophic damage to vital equipment.

  1. Follow recommended commissioning/start-up procedures when installing a new valve. The use of start-up trim during commissioning ensures that trash in the lines does not damage the valve’s trim and other equipment down the line.
  2. Always have recommended spare parts on hand. It will not only reduce downtime, but can save millions of dollars in lost production and rush charges.
  3. Whenever possible, install valves with smart positioners and advanced diagnostics that monitor the mechanical condition of the valve and provide early notice of potential issues.


Perform Proper Commissioning/Startup

As a plant is constructed or expanded, it is perfectly normal for debris, trash and weld slag to accumulate in the lines. If not flushed out before the plant startup, these materials can clog and damage the valve’s trim, compromising its performance and potentially damaging equipment downstream.

Properly commissioning valves before startup reduces the potential for damage to the valves and other equipment and helps ensure the valves will deliver optimal performance, including tight shutoff when closed, and fast, accurate response when open. That not only protects the plant’s investment and warranty coverage, but also reduces the risk of a costly and time-consuming restart of the plant.

Commissioning involves installing “dummy” trim, gaskets and packing to protect the valve’s seating surfaces, plug, stems, seat rings, diffusers and cages. This dummy trim has larger holes than the operational trim, allowing slag, debris and trash to easily pass through as the lines are flushed. Once the lines are clean, the dummy trim is replaced with the fully operational trim and normal operation can get underway. Proper startup and commissioning can take several hours to two weeks to complete, depending on the size of the valve and plant. Always complete recommended commissioning procedures before a new plant goes online. Many plant operators include commissioning as part of routine maintenance processes.

Valve manufacturers will usually provide instructions for properly commissioning their valves. Plant operators should emphasize to whoever is installing or maintaining their valves—whether it’s a general contractor, an outside valve technician or an internal maintenance team—the importance of a clean, thorough commissioning process.

It’s a small investment that buys a powerful insurance policy. A severe service or critical valve can cost $500,000 or more. The cost of a commissioning kit is 10% that of the valve itself (or less). That kit will protect not only the valve, but also the equipment that is the very heart of the plant—equipment that can cost 50 times more than the valve.

Take, for example, the $350,000 valve that recently was installed in a new plant. The plant operator opted not to protect its investment with a commissioning kit. Weld rod from an unrelated part of the plant clogged the valve trim, rendering the valve useless. Because it was a custom valve that had been designed and manufactured specifically for this plant, the lead time for replacement trim was significant. The valve manufacturer scrambled to supply the parts as quickly as possible, but the customer still faced delays and additional costs that could have been easily avoided.

 

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