06242016Fri
Last updateFri, 24 Jun 2016 2pm

i

Problem-Driven Innovation

Problem-Driven Innovation

Developing Alternative Technology to Imp...

Valve Repair Takes Center Stage in Houston

Valve Repair Takes Center Stage in Houston

Attendees gathered June 2-3 in Houston t...

What Internal Best Practices Can Do for Valve Selection

What Internal Best Practices Can Do for Valve Selection

As time goes by, technology moves forwar...

Subscribe

SUBSCRIBE

•  Digital magazine

•  Print magazine

•  VALVE eNews

Read the latest issue of VALVE Magazine

BUYERS GUIDE 300x220

New Products

  • ja-news-2
  • ja-news-3

Industry Headlines

Advertisement
i

Web Only

Problem-Driven Innovation

Problem-Driven Innovation

Monday, 20 June 2016  |  Mark A. Lobo, P.E.

Developing Alternative Technology to Improve Product Performance

Industrial product engineering teaches us to understand the difference between problem...

Readmore

Loading...

Industry Headlines

Curtiss-Wright Awarded Contracts for U.S. Naval Defense Platforms

1 DAY AGO

Curtiss-Wright announced that it has been awarded contracts valued in excess of $80 million to provide valves for the U.S. Navy’s Virginia-class submarines and Ford-class aircraft carriers. The awards were received from Bechtel Plant Machinery, Inc. and General Dynamics Electric Boat Division ...

Readmore

DeZURIK Adds Dedicated Clean Room to Sartell Plant

3 DAYS AGO

In order to ensure proper cleaning procedures are performed on valves intended for oxygen, ozone, chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, isocyanate and other applications, DeZURIK has constructed a new dedicated clean room within its Sartell, MN manufacturing plant.

Operated by trained cleaning technicians, DeZU...

Readmore

Global Upstream Spending Slashed by $1 Trillion

1 DAY AGO

Global upstream development spending from 2015 to 2020 has been cut by 22% or $740 billion since the oil price started to drop two years ago, according Wood Mackenzie's research . When you include cuts to conventional exploration investment, the figure increases to just over $1 trillion. Expect to see...

Readmore

EPA Bans Fracking Wastewater Disposal at Public Treatment Plants

3 DAYS AGO

The EPA has finalized a rule establishing pretreatment standards for discharges of wastewater from onshore unconventional oil and gas (UOG) extraction facilities to municipal sewage treatment plants (also known as publicly owned treatment works, or POTWs). The rule is designed to prevent the discharge...

Readmore

U..S. Durable Goods Orders Down 2.2% in May

6 HOURS AGO

New orders for manufactured durable goods in May decreased $5.3 billion or 2.2% to $230.7 billion, the Commerce Department announced today. This decrease , down following two consecutive monthly increases, followed a 3.3% April increase. Excluding transportation, new orders decreased 0.3%. Excluding d...

Readmore

Federal Judge Halts New BLM Fracking Rules

1 DAY AGO

“The Obama administration will fight a federal judge’s ruling overturning its effort to regulate hydraulic fracturing on public lands,” Bloomberg reports . The White House says they will take the case to the U.S. Court of Appeals.

“The ruling, issued late Tuesday by Wyoming-based...

Readmore

Wrong Alloy?

materials_q_and_a_graphicQ: My 316 stainless-steel valve is rusty and attracts a magnet. Did I get the wrong alloy?

 

A: Let's answer the second part of the question first. Forged 300-series stainless steels should be non-magnetic. However, cast versions of the 300-series stainless steels-such as CF8 (304), CF3 (304L), CF8M (316), CF3M (316L), CG8M (317), CG3M (317L), CF8C (347), etc.-are all formulated to contain some ferrite. The presence of ferrite makes the alloy less prone to cracking as the hot casting cools in the mold. Weld filler materials are also formulated to contain some ferrite for the same reason. The ferrite makes the material attract a magnet. The exact amount of ferrite, which influences the strength of magnetic attraction, is dependent on the exact chemical composition and the thermal history of the casting. In any event, CF3, CF8, CF3M, CF8M, CG3M, CG8M, and CF8C should all attract a magnet to some degree. In fact, if you have a casting in one of these alloys that doesn't attract a magnet, you should wonder whether something is wrong.

 

Now let's discuss the rusting portion of the question. While the term stainless steel implies that such an alloy is "stainless" or will not rust, the reality is that stainless-steel castings can exhibit a rusty appearance if not processed correctly. The rusty appearance is only superficial surface rust, i.e. iron oxide, and for most applications it is neither a problem nor an indication as to how the equipment will perform in service. However, there are some services where this surface rust is objectionable and special processing is necessary to make sure the stainless-steel castings are truly "stainless." Some of the industries where any rust is undesirable are food and beverage, pharmaceutical, and electronics.

Shot blasting is routinely used by foundries and forge shops to remove burned-in sand, core material, and scale that are formed during casting, forging, and/or heat-treating processes. Steel shot is normally used because it is the quickest and most economical cleaning abrasive. A slight amount of iron contamination remains on the surface of the stainless steel, and may later cause surface discoloration or rusting.

Sand blasting or grit blasting with various abrasives may also be used to clean castings and forgings. If the sand or abrasive was previously used on steel, it may contaminate the stainless-steel surface, which can result in rusting. Therefore, if sand or grit blasting is utilized, the sand or grit should either be new or only used previously for cleaning stainless-steel items.

Pickling, or the more technically correct term acid cleaning, is used to remove iron oxide that formed during the heat treatment of stainless steel or to remove free iron contamination that may have occurred from shot blasting, grit blasting, and/or grinding of stainless- steel castings or forgings. Normally, acid cleaning is only necessary for alloys that do not have sufficient chromium content to prevent oxidation of the surface during heat treatment, such as the 300-series stainless steels. The higher-chromium-content duplex stainless steels do not require acid cleaning unless they are to be used in one of the rust-sensitive industries mentioned above. Pickling is normally done as a last step before machining.

Passivation is the process by which a stainless steel will form a thin, invisible, chemically inactive surface when exposed to air or other oxygen-containing environments. At one time it was considered necessary to apply an oxidizing treatment to stainless steels in order to establish this protective oxide film. It is now accepted that this oxide film will form spontaneously in any oxygen-containing environment provided the surface has been thoroughly acid cleaned, i.e. pickled or descaled. This oxide film is the mechanism by which corrosion-resistant alloys achieve their corrosion resistance. Although a stainless steel is basically self passivating in any oxygen-containing environment, even air, some users of stainless-steel equipment still feel it is necessary to require a separate passivation treatment. If passivation is performed, it is generally done after finish machining.

Acid cleaning and passivation are covered by ASTM specifications A380 and A967. These specifications provide complete details on the acid cleaning and passivation of stainless steels as well as a variety of tests to measure the effectiveness of these processes, including simple wet-dry immersion tests to chemical testing for the detection of free iron. As with any special order requirement, there should be discussions between the manufacturer and customer up front so that everyone is in complete agreement on the processes to be used and how the results will be measured.

  • Latest Post

  • Popular

  • Links

  • Events

Advertisement

Looking for a career in the Valve Industry?

ValveCareers Horiz

To learn more, watch the videos below or visit ValveCareers.com a special initiative of the Valve Manufacturers Association