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Last updateMon, 02 May 2016 9pm

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Food and Beverage Processing

Food and Beverage Processing

When wandering the grocery store aisles,...

Variable Frequency Drives in Electric Actuators

Variable Frequency Drives in Electric Actuators

Electric actuators are vital for operati...

Braided Packing: An Old Technology with a Modern Twist

Braided Packing: An Old Technology with a Modern Twist

Compression packing is the primary metho...

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Industry Headlines

MRC Global Announces First Quarter 2016 Results

2 HOURS AGO  |  Chris Guy

MRC Global Inc. today announced first quarter 2016 results. The company's sales were $783 million for the first quarter of 2016, which were 39% lower ...

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Industry Headlines

MRC Global Announces First Quarter 2016 Results

2 HOURS AGO

MRC Global Inc. today announced first quarter 2016 results. The company's sales were $783 million for the first quarter of 2016, which were 39% lower than the first quarter of 2015 and 19% lower than the fourth quarter of 2015. As compared to last year, reduced customer activity across all segments ...

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CIRCOR Reports First-Quarter 2016 Financial Results

7 HOURS AGO

CIRCOR International announced financial results for the first quarter ended April 3, 2016. In the quarter CIRCOR delivered revenue of $151 million and Adjusted EPS of $0.52.

“CIRCOR delivered solid first-quarter financial results , demonstrating ongoing progress on our margin expansion and simpl...

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Energy Sector Weighs on Construction Starts

4 DAYS AGO

At a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $660.5 billion, new construction starts in March receded 1% from February’s pace, according to Dodge Data & Analytics. Total construction starts had jumped 13% in February, led by a huge gain for the electric utility and gas plant category. The dolla...

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Chevron Investing Billions in The Permian Basin

5 DAYS AGO

At Chevron’s annual security analyst meeting last month, chairman and CEO John Watson said that his company plans on investing billions into oil & gas projects in the Permian Basin.

According to the Hobbs News-Sun , Watson predicted they could be pumping up to 350,000 barrels a day out of West ...

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ISM: Manufacturing Activity Increased in April

3 HOURS AGO

Manufacturing expanded in April as the PMI registered 50.8%, a decrease of 1% from the March reading of 51.8%, indicating growth in manufacturing for the second consecutive month, following five consecutive months of contraction in manufacturing.

The Institute of Supply Management (ISM) reports that 15...

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House Passes Bill To Lower Import Tariffs On Manufacturers

4 DAYS AGO

This week, the House voted 415-2 for the American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2016. The bipartisan, bicameral bill reforms the way Congress considers legislation for suspending tariffs on products not made in the U.S., what some are calling, “manufacturing tax breaks.” The legis...

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The Human Factor in Valve Operation

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Worker safety, efficiency and the cost of operations, and most recently, new methods of control, are key focal points in operating valves. One factor that affects all areas is the role and level of human involvement in the processes.

THE CHOICES

Opening or closing valves can be completed either by manual input or automated devices driven by various energy sources. Manual operators are simple, inexpensive and require little peripheral planning beyond the installation and orientation of operators in the process line. Automated devices, on the other hand, require input energy systems, control systems, additional installation space and infrastructure for support, operation and maintenance.

Two concerns considered during selection of manual operators are the effort required to operate the valve and the number of turns some valves require. A lot of effort and a high number of turns can result in personnel fatigue, safety concerns, excessive time for operation and the need for multiple personnel. Also under consideration in selecting manual operators are the valve’s expected frequency of operation and the physical location of the operation, such as whether it might be high in a superstructure or situated in an inhospitable environment. Both also present challenges to humans.

Designers have to weigh all of these factors in their decision matrix to receive the most productive yet acceptable selection of how a valve should be operated. Two aspects that primarily define operator selection are human factors and economic factors. Human factors can be defined as the human capability to cycle the valve in a safe, timely and economically sound manner. These factors require considerations such as the work needed to be done (turns and rim pull) to operate the valve, the environment in which the valve is located, the time required to complete the task, and the health and safety of the personnel involved. Economic factors include the cost of the actuator as well as the cost of infrastructure, which could include wiring, controls system, power required and ongoing maintenance to support automated solutions.

THE SPECS INVOLVED

Specifications for the highest values personnel should exert on levers or handwheels to operate a valve are defined in the industry, with current API specifications limiting pull to 360 newtons (80 pounds-force). Mechanical advantage can be used to decrease the pull required to open or close the valve by increasing the length of the lever or diameter of the handwheel mounted on the valve. How­ever, the maximum lever length or handwheel diameter is also limited by industry specifications.

As valve torque increases, maximum limits imposed by industry standards result in levers transitioning to gear units to increase mechanical advantage. However, this increase in mechanical advantage comes with the disadvantage of increasing the number of turns to move the valve across the full stroke distance.

The higher number of turns results in longer time required to cycle the valve at a constant number of revolutions per minute. With significant gear reduction, the number of turns required for full cycle can number in the hundreds. This increased number of turns leads to a greater opportunity for accidents or injury to personnel due to repetitive motion and fatigue. Companies will limit the rim pull and number of turns to reduce the risk. Once established limits are exceeded for turns, the valve is generally required to be automated.

Communicating what human factor limits might be imposed on valves can provide suppliers the opportunity to recommend the best value of operator for manual valves. Until recently, the valve industry was limited to levers, bevel gears and traditional worm gears for manual cycling. Once these devices exceeded worker safety limits, a valve purchaser’s only choice was to select an automated solution. However, new devices available in the marketplace extend the range of manual operators. These devices can reduce initial capital costs, reduce site design complexity and minimize operating expenditures. The devices include high-efficiency gear operators and portable drivers coupled with well-designed arrestors.


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