06222018Fri
Last updateFri, 22 Jun 2018 2pm

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From Cannon Balls to Pressure Seals: Graphite for Sealing

From Cannon Balls to Pressure Seals: Graphite for Sealing

From time to time, we re-publish well-re...

Gaskets Are Not Created Equal

Gaskets Are Not Created Equal

Gaskets are near the bottom of the food ...

Your Valves May Be Weaponized

Your Valves May Be Weaponized

The advent of the Internet of Things (Io...

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Industry Headlines

SVF Flow Controls Joins VMA

Friday, 22 June 2018  |  Chris Guy

This week SVF Flow Controls became a full member of the Valve Manufacturers Association (VMA). This is the fourth new VMA member in 2018 so far.

For over...

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Industry Headlines

SVF Flow Controls Joins VMA

5 HOURS AGO

This week SVF Flow Controls became a full member of the Valve Manufacturers Association (VMA). This is the fourth new VMA member in 2018 so far.

For over 35 years SVF Flow Controls of La Palma, CA has been manufacturing ball valves, actuators and controls for all industrial applications.

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Emerson Wins Global Tank Storage Award

1 DAY AGO

Emerson’s Rosemount 5900S 2-in-1 Radar Level Gauge has won the Outstanding Terminal Safety Technology Award at the 2018 Global Tank Storage Awards. This award is given to a product or technology that adds an additional layer of safety to the terminal and reduces risk to employees and the surroun...

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U.S. Specialty Chemicals Markets Continue to Gain

1 DAY AGO

The American Chemistry Council (ACC) reported that U.S. specialty chemicals market volumes continued to gain during the second quarter, increasing 0.5% in May after an upwardly revised 1% gain in April and a 0.4% gain in March. All changes in the data are reported on a three-month moving average (3M...

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Global LNG Trade Growing, Led by Australia and the U.S.

2 DAYS AGO

Global trade in liquefied natural gas (LNG) reached 38.2 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in 2017, a 10% (3.5 Bcf/d) increase from 2016 and the largest annual volume increase since 2010, according to the Annual Report on LNG trade by the International Association of Liquefied Natural Gas Importers...

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Optimism an All-Time High in NAM Survey

1 DAY AGO

In the latest Manufacturers’ Outlook Survey from the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), it’s clear that businesses continue to experience highly elevated levels of activity as a result of policies like tax reform, with optimism once again breaking records —95.1% of responde...

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Texas Economy Continues to Expand at “Solid Pace”

2 DAYS AGO

The Texas economy is expanding at a solid pace. Employment has grown at a 3.6% annualized rate through May, driven by job gains in the goods-producing sector. Unemployment remains near its historical low, and labor markets are tight. The Dallas Fed’s Texas Business Outlook Surveys (TBOS) suggest...

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Making Progress On Improving Our Aging Water Infrastructure

spr11_watermain_break_photo.jpg

The nation’s utilities are employing rate increases, technology and other tools to maintain and, in some cases, upgrade or replace, our water infrastructure.

The frequency of water leaks and main breaks occurring across the U.S. is increasing at a steep rate as years of unchecked deterioration take their toll on a water infrastructure that, in places, dates back to the second half of the 19th century. Utilities and state and federal agencies are well aware of this growing dilemma. However, the unusually high number of devastating main breaks is significantly increasing public awareness of the dire condition of the country’s water system.

In February 2011, news outlets across the country reported that Kansas City, MO, experienced 467 main breaks this winter alone—a 73% increase in the number of breaks the city experienced during the winter of 2010. Montgomery and Prince George’s County, MD, which deliver water to 1.8 million people, also made news headlines for breaks in their water systems. According to one article, both counties set a record in December 2010 for having the largest number of water main breaks in a single month—647. The following month, Prince George’s County experienced a 54-inch water main break that damaged nearby businesses and leaked an estimated 50 million gallons of water.

While municipal spending on water systems is taking place, much of it is for emergency repair, and it is not nearly enough to cover the estimated spending gap for necessary repairs and replacement. As stated by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) in its 2009 report, “America’s drinking water systems face an annual shortfall of at least $11 billion to replace aging facilities that are near the end of their useful lives and to comply with existing and future federal water regulations. This does not account for any growth in the demand for drinking water over the next 20 years.”

To address the shortfalls, municipalities and water utilities are looking at a variety of funding sources, including municipal bond issuance, higher water rates and increasing operational efficiencies.

Municipal bond issuance is a common funding source for water systems. However, some investors have recently expressed concern about the risk of possible municipal defaults. Results of a Reuters poll published in February 2011, found that more than half of Wall Street professionals, including municipal bond traders and investors, anticipate that up to four multibillion-dollar municipal bond defaults will take place this year.

Fortunately, certain investment analysts and ratings agencies have a more optimistic view of municipal bonds that focus on water systems. A recent Fitch Ratings report explained the relatively stable credit quality of water bond issuers. The report cites numerous supporting factors, including the essentiality of water and its monopoly status, which has helped shield the water sector from certain economic factors.

Some analysts say that recovering more of the actual cost of water—if not moving toward full-cost pricing—could be an important avenue to increase the investment needed in our aging water infrastructure. They point out that water rates in the U.S. are typically less than in other developed countries. In fact, results of the International Water Report and Cost Survey, conducted by NUS Consulting Group in 2007, indicated that U.S. water rates were the least expensive at 66 cents per cubic meter average compared to the 13 other developed countries that were surveyed (Denmark’s rates were the highest at $2.25 per cubic meter).

A significant source of funding for water and wastewater comes from the revenues generated by user rates; therefore, pricing water to accurately reflect the costs of providing quality water services is one strategy that utilities are using to maintain infrastructure and encourage conservation.

However, as rates increase, utilities will need to proactively educate consumers on the true value of water to absorb the shock of higher rates and ease consumer acceptance of those rates, according to Avoiding Rate Shock: Making the Case for Water Rates, a study sponsored by the AWWA [American Water Works Association] Water Utility Council. The study found that consumers get upset over rate increases because of misunderstandings about the true value of a safe, adequate supply of water, and that a consistent, structured communications strategy can build support for rate increases.

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