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Introduction to Pressure Relief Devices - Part 1

Introduction to Pressure Relief Devices - Part 1

When the pressure inside equipment such ...

Is Your Company Ready for The New Reality?

Is Your Company Ready for The New Reality?

Since August, 2015, when VMA’s 201...

Offshore Oil Extraction and Transportation

Offshore Oil Extraction and Transportation

Offshore oil facilities come to the fore...

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Industry Headlines

ITT Reports 2015 Fourth-Quarter, Full-Year Results

1 DAY AGO

On a GAAP basis, ITT delivered revenue of $2.5 billion in 2015, reflecting a 6% decline, primarily due to the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange of $194 million. GAAP operating income increased 43%.

Organic revenue in the Industrial Process segment decreased 6%, reflecting strength in short-cyc...

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MRC Global Signs Agreement to Sell OCTG Business

2 DAYS AGO

MRC Global Inc. has entered into a definitive agreement to sell its U.S. Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) business to Sooner Pipe, LLC, a subsidiary of Marubeni-Itochu Tubulars America, Inc., for $48 million, subject to certain adjustments.

MRC Global's U.S. OCTG sales were approximately $305 milli...

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EPA Halts Implementation of Clean Power Plan

1 DAY AGO

Earlier this week, in a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court granted an industry motion to stay the EPA’s Clean Power Plan while the lower courts determine its legality. Last fall a lawsuit was filed on behalf of more than two dozen states, utilities and industry groups.

“States did not...

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IHS: North American Drillers Need Billions More in Cuts

3 DAYS AGO

The depressed oil price environment is painting a gloomy outlook for North American exploration and production (E&Ps) companies, and further, significant CAPEX cuts are needed in order for the group to demonstrate real financial discipline and align spending more closely with cash flow, accordin...

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U.S. Job Openings Climb to Second-Highest Level on Record

4 DAYS AGO

The number of job openings increased to 5.6 million in December, the second highest number ever recorded, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Hires and separations were little changed at 5.4 million and 5.1 million, respectively. Within separations, the quits rate was 2.1%, and the l...

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Machine Tool Orders Rose in December, Down in 2015

4 DAYS AGO

The U.S. Manufacturing Technology Orders report for December 2015 showed that order values grew 20.4% compared to the prior month, according to The Association for Manufacturing Technology (AMT). For all of 2015, the year’s total orders were down 17.4% compared to 2014.

While the month-to-mon...

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Multi-colored Stain on Valves

materials_q_and_a_graphicQ: I am handling high purity-water and keep getting a multi-colored stain on my valves and other equipment. What is this, and how can I prevent it?

A: You are describing a phenomenon called "rouging," a term that pertains to the multi-colored stain you are seeing. Rouging is a problem that is seen primarily in high-purity water applications or steam. Though more commonly associated with the pharmaceutical and electronics industries, it can occur most anywhere. At the lower temperatures rouge is red or yellowish in appearance, but in high-temperature steam it will be dark gray or black. The FDA has not made any formal opinion about rouging, but pharmaceutical companies are concerned about contamination of their products so they go to great lengths to prevent it and to clean their systems when it occurs-incurring undesired downtime and expense.

The mechanism of rouging is still not fully understood and as a result there are some myths and misconceptions about what it is and how to prevent it. Essentially, rouge is a form of rust, i.e., iron oxide, but different than the heavy rust seen when stainless steel is not cleaned properly after heat treatment or welding. While normal rust is a result of improper cleaning during manufacture, rouge is a much thinner layer that occurs when perfectly cleaned stainless steel reacts with high-purity water environments. Rouge seems to be more prevalent at temperatures in excess or 60° C.

We know that stainless steels achieve their corrosion resistance by developing a very thin microscopic chromium oxide layer. The general consensus about rouging is that certain services, such as high purity water with very low oxygen content, dissolve this protective layer and allow the stainless steel to resume corroding. This corrosion is then responsible for the staining we call rouging. These stains have been analyzed as being various types of iron oxide as well as containing traces of chromium and nickel.

While mainly an aesthetics problem, most people still want to prevent rouge in their systems. One commonly held belief is that the ferrite phase in cast stainless steels or welds causes rouging, and purchasers of valves and other equipment frequently impose strict limits on the ferrite content of cast stainless steels. Since wrought stainless steels with no ferrite also experience rouging, it doesn't appear that ferrite is the culprit.

A study conducted by AvestaPolarit1, found that the water's gas content and a metal's surface finish were influential for rouging. Basically, water with high oxygen and low carbon dioxide content was less likely to cause rouging as were electro-polished surfaces of the metal components. This study also found no significant correlation for the different alloy grades, including duplex stainless steels with their high ferrite content.

Since most people find rouge objectionable in their systems, much attention has been given to its removal. Various acids and chelates are used to clean systems of rouge, but these can leave behind their own contaminates or films. In addition, if acid exposure is not controlled closely, the acid can etch the metal surfaces thus destroying the expensive electro-polished surfaces. Therefore, the most effective way to prevent rouge is by somehow introducing sufficient oxygen to the system, which helps maintain the protective chromium oxide layer.

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