02232017Thu
Last updateTue, 21 Feb 2017 8pm

i

Human Factors Can Cause a Disaster—or Prevent One

Human Factors Can Cause a Disaster—or Prevent One

Process industry plants are complex and ...

Improving Valve Sealing Performance and Reliability

Improving Valve Sealing Performance and Reliability

From time to time, we are re-posting wel...

A Primer on Fugitive Emissions

A Primer on Fugitive Emissions

Fourscore and seven years ago, no one ha...

The Weekly Report

New Products

  • ja-news-2
  • ja-news-3

Industry Headlines

Industry Headlines

Powell Valve Approves Flotech as Authorized Repair Facility

1 DAY AGO

The Wm. Powell Company recently approved Flotech as an authorized modification and repair facility for Powell Valves.

“Flotech has been manufacturing and repairing valves for over 40 years. Adding another high quality valve manufacturer to the list of valve companies Flotech represents speaks vol...

Readmore

CIRCOR Reports Fourth Quarter 2016 Financial Results

1 DAY AGO

CIRCOR International, Inc. reports revenue of $158 million, GAAP EPS of ($0.12) and adjusted EPS of $0.48 in the fourth quarter of 2016 . CIRCOR had an operating cash flow of $20 million and free cash flow of $17 million for the quarter. Cost control and restructuring actions continued to drive bottom...

Readmore

Southern California Updating Natural Gas Pipeline Infrastructure

1 DAY AGO

Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) will upgrade or replace 50 to 60 pipeline valves in 2017 to further enhance the safety of its system. The effort is part of SoCalGas' Pipeline Safety Enhancement Plan (PSEP), a multi-billion-dollar program that tests and updates the natural gas pipeline infra...

Readmore

How New U.S. Policies Will Affect the Chemical Industry

7 DAYS AGO

“In 2017, barring a recession in the U.S. and Europe or a slowdown in China, Moody’s Investor Service expects EBITDA in the chemicals industry to slip by 1 or 2% year-over-year.”

A new report from PwC predicts that the Trump administration “is likely to embrace policies that are...

Readmore

Empire State Manufacturing Expands at Fastest Rate Since 2014

1 DAY AGO

Business activity expanded at a solid clip in New York State, according to firms responding to the February 2017 Empire State Manufacturing Survey. The headline general business conditions index rose twelve points to 18.7, its highest level in more than two years. The new orders index climbed to 13.5,...

Readmore

Philly Fed Manufacturing Conditions Continued to Improve in February

6 DAYS AGO

The index for current manufacturing activity in eastern Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey and Delaware increased from a reading of 23.6 in January to 43.3 this month and has remained positive for seven consecutive months. The share of firms reporting growth continues to increase: More than 48% of the ...

Readmore

Multi-colored Stain on Valves

materials_q_and_a_graphicQ: I am handling high purity-water and keep getting a multi-colored stain on my valves and other equipment. What is this, and how can I prevent it?

A: You are describing a phenomenon called "rouging," a term that pertains to the multi-colored stain you are seeing. Rouging is a problem that is seen primarily in high-purity water applications or steam. Though more commonly associated with the pharmaceutical and electronics industries, it can occur most anywhere. At the lower temperatures rouge is red or yellowish in appearance, but in high-temperature steam it will be dark gray or black. The FDA has not made any formal opinion about rouging, but pharmaceutical companies are concerned about contamination of their products so they go to great lengths to prevent it and to clean their systems when it occurs-incurring undesired downtime and expense.

The mechanism of rouging is still not fully understood and as a result there are some myths and misconceptions about what it is and how to prevent it. Essentially, rouge is a form of rust, i.e., iron oxide, but different than the heavy rust seen when stainless steel is not cleaned properly after heat treatment or welding. While normal rust is a result of improper cleaning during manufacture, rouge is a much thinner layer that occurs when perfectly cleaned stainless steel reacts with high-purity water environments. Rouge seems to be more prevalent at temperatures in excess or 60° C.

We know that stainless steels achieve their corrosion resistance by developing a very thin microscopic chromium oxide layer. The general consensus about rouging is that certain services, such as high purity water with very low oxygen content, dissolve this protective layer and allow the stainless steel to resume corroding. This corrosion is then responsible for the staining we call rouging. These stains have been analyzed as being various types of iron oxide as well as containing traces of chromium and nickel.

While mainly an aesthetics problem, most people still want to prevent rouge in their systems. One commonly held belief is that the ferrite phase in cast stainless steels or welds causes rouging, and purchasers of valves and other equipment frequently impose strict limits on the ferrite content of cast stainless steels. Since wrought stainless steels with no ferrite also experience rouging, it doesn't appear that ferrite is the culprit.

A study conducted by AvestaPolarit1, found that the water's gas content and a metal's surface finish were influential for rouging. Basically, water with high oxygen and low carbon dioxide content was less likely to cause rouging as were electro-polished surfaces of the metal components. This study also found no significant correlation for the different alloy grades, including duplex stainless steels with their high ferrite content.

Since most people find rouge objectionable in their systems, much attention has been given to its removal. Various acids and chelates are used to clean systems of rouge, but these can leave behind their own contaminates or films. In addition, if acid exposure is not controlled closely, the acid can etch the metal surfaces thus destroying the expensive electro-polished surfaces. Therefore, the most effective way to prevent rouge is by somehow introducing sufficient oxygen to the system, which helps maintain the protective chromium oxide layer.

  • Latest Post

  • Popular

  • Links

  • Events

Advertisement

Looking for a career in the Valve Industry?

ValveCareers Horiz

To learn more, watch the videos below or visit ValveCareers.com a special initiative of the Valve Manufacturers Association