Last updateThu, 15 Mar 2018 4pm


Valve Repair Companies

It’s unwise to pay too much, but it’s worse to pay too little. When you pay too much you lose a little money, that’s all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. —John Ruskin

That famous quote from social thinker John Ruskin was sent in to Valve Magazine from Urmimala Mukhopadhyay, marketing analyst for Cameron Valves & Measurement. It summarizes very well what many Valve Repair Council (VRC) members feel is the main danger of not using an OEM-certified company in making valve repairs.


Just Read the Instructions

Although the situation might change eventually, it’s a reality that most people working in the valve repair industry today are men. It is also a reality that many men hate to read instructions or rely on a map. However, when repairing critical pressure-containing equipment such as valves, a little glance at the words now and then can be important. And when it comes to valve repair instructions and standards, sometimes it takes a little digging to find the right paragraphs of wisdom.


A Guide to Valve Cleaning and Specifications

Most of the time we only require that valves be free of basic dirt and debris before they are put in service. However, occasionally service requirements dictate that all traces of oil, dust and grease be removed. A prime example is valves to be used with oxygen. In that case, even a small speck of oil in a 100% oxygen environment can create a devastating explosion. One tiny metallic sliver could cause a minute spark, which is all that would be required to trigger the destruction.


The Nuts and Bolts of Nuts and Bolts

Repairing a valve usually means ­discarding old fasteners and replacing them with new ones. But it takes more than just matching thread diameter and pitch to make the correct fastener selection.

First let’s discuss why a bolting change would be necessary. Nuts and bolts serve two purposes: they hold components in alignment or they provide clamping force. In some cases, they do both. In the case of valve body/bonnet joints, the fastener’s function is to clamp the two pressure-containing valve halves tightly together with a gasket between them to prevent fluid leakage. When a bolt is tightened, it is stretched a small amount. If it was not stretched, there would be no clamping force.


Protect Me Please

Everyone in the valve industry should be in the protection racket. No, I don’t mean dealing with cousin Vito from Jersey; I‘m talking about protecting valves after they leave the plant for shipment to the customer or while they are in storage waiting to be used. Valves that are contaminated or damaged before they are installed are a real problem that costs the industry hundreds of thousands of dollars every year to correct, either through repair or replacement.




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